THE LEAD

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

U.S. Midterms Carry Risk of Chaos, and Chance of a New Paradigm of Progress

October 24, 2018
Dresident Donald J. Trump delivers remarks at the White House State Leadership Day conference addressing local elected officials of Alaska, California and Hawaii Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. (Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian)
Dresident Donald J. Trump delivers remarks at the White House State Leadership Day conference addressing local elected officials of Alaska, California and Hawaii Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. (Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian)

President Donald Trump on Monday night spoke to more than 30,000 Americans in Houston, according to the Texas Lieutenant Governor's report — the President's largest and most enthusiastic rally yet. Some 17,000 were packed in the Toyota Arena, with another 15,000 watching on large screens outside.

Though filled with off-the-cuff remarks on many subjects, his remarks took on the most orderly succession when he discussed the real progress his Presidency has made with the United States economy. "600,000 new manufacturing jobs in two years" was an essentially correct claim, not considered at all likely when Trump took office. 7.14 million job openings (in September) was a remarkable record level.

But there lies the greatest risk facing the President and the country. The growing fears of a crash of the huge debt bubbles — U.S. and European corporate debt the worst — which have grown from central bank money-printing, are correct. As Independent Texas Congressional candidate Kesha Rogers warns in an interview this week, if the mid-term elections do not end — decisively — the attempted coup against the President by impeachment or other means, the onrush of a financial crash, perhaps worse than that of 2008, will produce chaos.

But the British intelligence-instigated coup plotters and Robert Mueller's legal assassins could be decisively checked in the election. Then the prospect of dealing with the oncoming crisis means the possibility that Trump could actually adopt an "American System" policy. As a candidate, the President spoke of things — a Glass-Steagall Act, a $1 trillion initial national investment in new high-technology infrastructure, a revived and expanded NASA manned space exploration — which are made possible with EIR Founding Editor Lyndon LaRouche's "Four Laws" to save the economy and nation, first put forward in 2014. That is what Rogers' campaign, and the national LaRouche Political Action Committee are mobilizing Americans for, with China's Belt and Road Initiative being a great example of such a new paradigm. Trump also clearly had the intention of great power collaboration, not war confrontation, with both Russia and China.

The mobilization which Rogers' campaign is leading nationally, is the path to that breakthrough, and to successfully overcoming the financial crisis now threatening.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

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