Jeb Bush's Neo-Fascist PNAC Connection

December 13, 2014

Jeb Bush's signature on the founding documents of the Project for a New American Century will defeat any effort by him to separate his putative presidential candidacy from his family's historical support of overt Nazi and fascist policies, including the revelations of torture detailed in the Senate's report of this week.

PNAC developed and sold the blueprint for the new Anglo-American imperialism which has turned the United States internally into a garrison police-state and an imperial force internationally deployed against any nation deemed unfriendly to British or American financial interests. Its primary target was China, which it describes as the potential great power competitor of the United States, although it is most famous for selling the war in Iraq.

Bush was joined as a PNAC founding signatory in 1997 by Dick Cheney, Elliot Abrams, Scooter Libby, Donald Rumsfeld, Midge Dector, Norman Podhoretz, Paul Wolfowitz, Frank Gaffney, Fred Ikle, and Robert Kagan (husband of Victoria Nuland). Its leadership included William Kristol, Kagan's father Donald Kagan, and Gary Schmitt. The devotion of many of these people to neo-fascist philosopher Leo Strauss is detailed in "Children of Satan."

Robert Kagan and William Kristol introduced PNAC in a 1997 Foreign Affairs article by attacking John Quincy Adams.

"John Quincy Adams said that America 'should not go forth in search of monsters to destroy', but why not? ... A policy of sitting on a hill and leading by example is a practice of cowardice and dishonor."

America needs to be the benevolent hegemon to the world, the sole superpower, and shape events in its own interest.

PNAC called for unilateral preemptive wars, including a first-strike nuclear capability; fought publicly in 1998 for a war on Iraq based on Saddam's alleged possession of weapons of mass destruction; and in 2000 produced a tome entitled "Rebuilding America's Defenses," much of which was incorporated into George Bush's 2002 national security plan.

In that document PNAC called for consolidating the victory of the Cold War in Europe by creating a Europe "whole and free from the Baltic to the Black Sea" (the same policy we see now in Ukraine), re-positioning U.S. forces around China to prevent a new Chinese century, and the "Clean Break" reshaping of the entire Middle East.

It advocated future weapons such as biological weapons which could target specific human genomes. Written one year before September 11, 2001, the authors noted that these changes in military posture could only occur rapidly if there were a catastrophic event, like a new Pearl Harbor.

As you read the torture report and think about the state of mind producing such behaviors in Americans, remember what was documented in the "Children of Satan." Leo Strauss and his mentor, Nazi crown jurist Carl Schmitt, believe that men are inherently evil, that Hobbes was right when he described the world as a war of each against all, a natural world of purgative violence.

The Bush dynasty is the legacy of fascism inside the United States, and today represent the ideological outlook of Nazi crown jurist Carl Schmitt that man can only be unified against other men.

Strauss to Schmitt, 1932:

"The ultimate foundation of right is the principle of the natural evil of man, because man is by nature evil, he therefore needs dominion. But dominion can be established, that is, men can be unified, only in unity against other men."

Schmitt attacked the Treaty of Westphalia as extinct because of World War I and replaced it with "concrete order thinking" as the basis for Nazi law—a kind of Nietzscheian situational ethics in which right exists in the hands of the conqueror. According to Strauss, the elite rule justifiably through the myths of laws, morals, and religion sold to a stupid populace. In their benevolent dictatorship, the elite rule through noble lies.

In a 2005 justification for the failed Iraq war, PNAC argued that Bush's decision was moral, based on Suddam's intentions and capabilities, both existing and potential and grounded in his prior behavior, not because of abstract legal norms—to wit, the concrete order thinking of Schmitt. It elsewhere argued that the war was necessary as a demonstration of American resolve and power in the world. Like the Carl Schmitt academic fad in universities throughout the U.S., PNAC's primary funding came from the Bradley and Scaife foundations. It went out of formal existence in 2006, stating that it had achieved its goals.