Obama's "Watergate Moment" Is Everywhere
June 17, 2012 • 10:11AM

The "Imperial Presidency" of Barack Obama is all over the U.S. press, right, left and center.

* Politico's Steve Friess writes under the headline "Obama's Policy Strategy: Ignore Laws," that Obama's domestic rulings against enforcing laws on gay marriage, marijuana, education laws, and (this week) on illegal immigrant deportations, that "Rather than pushing new laws through a divided Congress to enact his agenda, Obama is relying on federal agencies to ignore, or at least not defend, laws that some of his important supporters — like Hispanic voters and the gay community — don't like."

Although not mentioning Obama's illegal wars and killing proclivities, Politico quotes a "White House official" who could pass for Carl Schmitt: "We work to achieve our policy goals in the most effective and appropriate way possible," the official said. "Often times Congress has blocked efforts and we look to pursue other appropriate means of achieving our policy goals. Sometimes this makes for less than ideal policy situations - such as the action we took on immigration -
BUT THE PRESIDENT ISN'T GOING TO BE STONEWALLED BY POLITICS, HE WILL PURSUE WHATEVER MEANS AVAILABLE TO DO BUSINESS ON BEHALF OF AMERICAN PEOPLE."

* Jonathan Turley from George Washington University, on Nixon and Obama: "The president is using executive power to do things Congress has refused to do, and that does fit a disturbing pattern of expansion of executive power under President Obama. In many ways, President Obama has fulfilled the dream of an imperial presidency that Richard Nixon strived for. On everything from (the Defense of Marriage Act) to the gaming laws, this is a president who is now functioning as a super legislator. He is effectively negating parts of the criminal code because he disagrees with them. That does go beyond the pale."

* Christian Science Monitor: Obama regularly "ignores laws passed by Congress in order to achieve a political objective, setting a troubling precedent for the power of the presidency. In some ways, its part of the evolution of an imperial Presidency, a term used by historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. to describe Richard Nixon's challenges to traditional checks and balances."

* Mark Krikorian, executive director of the conservative Center for Immigration Studies: "This isn't about immigration but about constitutional order. One problem is that even Democrats in Congress now have no right to complain about future usurpations — they might as well all go home and have Napoleon run the country.

* Victor Davis Hanson of the right wing National Review: "Obama is turning out to be the most subversive chief executive in terms of eroding U.S. law since Richard Nixon."